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Here Be Monsters Meat Poster

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Here Be Monsters Meat Poster

from 18.00

Our mouthwatering HBM logo carved into a raw steak.  We hope it brightens up your mantle, your child’s bedroom, or maybe even your toilet room.  Perfect as a gift for your bloodthirsty podcast friends or your favorite vegetarian.  

Designed by Adam Fein (of Circle Shirt fame).  

12 ¼ x 12 ¼ inch.  Same size as an LP, so it fits nice in a record frame. 

Printed on Royal Fiber Cottonwood 80# Cover, which is a speckled paper, matte, acid-free and 30% post-consumer recycled.  

We'll even sign it and write you a special message if you want.  Just select the "signed" option.  We'll send you an email to get it all sorted out. 

 

Signed:
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Buy That Meat Poster!

Meat is the incomparably ultimate food. Imagine a cartoon feast (or Google one) and I guarantee a turkey or ham is at the center. Beef is the Ur-American food. Steak is the obvious choice of cowboys and capitalists. You know the Koch brothers high-five over ribeyes.

But meat is also the most disgusting food. The fatty, muscular striations and the seeping blood are disgusting. Enlarged—seeing the cellular grain in detail—it is difficult to endure: ‘One can love one’s neighbors in the abstract, or even at a distance, but at close quarters it’s almost impossible.’

This tension between delight and disgust is what fascinates me, but also the ways we tolerate this tension: we separate the living thing from the food. We physically remove ourselves from the process of turning animals into meat, slaughter. Rather, we interact with animals in petting zoos and seek meat in supermarket aisles. Consider that in America the most expensive cuts of meat resemble animals the least. Filet mignon is a just red circle, lacking the viscerality of the tongues and pig trotters that are traditionally for the poor. We use different words for beef and cow, pork and pig, so that the two could never be the same. This is doubly true when you consider the etymologies of those terms: words reserved for those who can afford to separate themselves from the animals, the living things. Today, everyone has that luxury. Our most modern, technologically-advanced meat products divorce the undesirable structural elements of meat—the tendons, the collagen—from the desirable appetitive elements of meat: the flavor, the protein. Hotdogs, chicken nuggets, deli slices, and Spam have all lost their animality.

It goes without saying that meat is everywhere. Between 87% and 97% of Americans chow down. Meat is not simply a paradox, it is a banal paradox; and HBM is fascinated with everyday weirdness. HBM, more than any other podcast, seeks to incorporate the peculiar into the everyday. What could be a better symbol than the banal surreal that awaits you in your fridge right now.
— Adam Fein, Designer.